Hey, Mom! The Explanation.

Here's the permanent dedicated link to my first Hey, Mom! post and the explanation of the feature it contains.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #746 - VICE: Body Architects - Monica Byrne


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #746 - VICE: Body Architects - Monica Byrne

Hi Mom,

Honestly, I haven't watched this video yet.

It's by Monica Byrne, whom I support on Patreon.

So, this is really just here for me to watch, but you may like it, too.

Isn't the title "body architects" intriguing?

Though Dad prefers architecture to be only applied to the work of actual architects of structures, but even writing that statement opens us to the definition of a "structure" and thus an architect.

Something to watch for Saturday...

From: https://www.unlimited.world/




FROM -

https://www.unlimited.world/vice/body-architects


Tomorrow arrives in many different forms every day. In this UNLIMITED film, powered by UBS, we meet the humans who are turning themselves into the future by taking the human body and augmenting it with cutting edge technology.

First, our host Monica Byrne meets Tim Cannon, the founding member and leader of a DIY bio-hacking collective known as Grindhouse Wetware. Based in the faded “Steel City” of Pittsburgh, Cannon has granted himself a “sixth sense” with the fossils of his hometown’s industrial past. The magnets embedded beneath the skin of his hands allow him to physically pick up objects and detect nearby electromagnetic fields, while he uses other implants to communicate with digital software and monitor his body temperature. The end game Cannon dreams of is one in which the human body is untethered from the constraints of time, and resistant to irksome phenomena such as ageing and death.
Natasha Vita-More’s quest for tomorrow is fuelled by tragedy; a failed pregnancy that made her question whether the vulnerabilities of the human body had to be regarded as inevitable. It’s a train of thought that has led to her creation of the Primo Post-human – an award-winning design for a “whole body prosthetic”, a kind of ultra-durable, human-shaped robot-shell that most readily brings to mind the Replicants of Blade Runner.
After that, we pay a visit to Dr Mike McLoughlin at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, who shows us a robot equipped with the world’s most advanced prosthetic arm. Controlled by the user’s brain, the arm is more powerful than the average person’s but also dextrous and subtle enough that its movements suggest an eerie capability for human tenderness.
“I think the future that we envision is one in which anybody can be anything they want and their biology doesn’t govern them,” Cannon says of the egalitarian, utopian motivations behind his work. “I can’t figure out how to function in the world without this desire to see what the next start over looks like. And I won’t be able to unless I actually outlive this bullshit monkey that I’ve been packaged into. I’m looking for freedom.”
All three share a common goal: to push humanity into the future by using tech to eliminate our biological limitations, in ways that could redefine our relationship with time – and its diverse symptoms, such as reproduction, sickness and death – forever.
– Kev Kharas


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 748 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1707.22 - 10:10

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.


Friday, July 21, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #745 - Valerian - all three trailers


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #745 - Valerian - all three trailers

Hi Mom,

I have been so excited for this movie, which I must make time to see and soon.

It premiered today.

Visually, this looks to be one of the most amazing science fiction films of all time (space opera, okay, but still...).

I even missed the comic books when they originally came out, as they were French; I hope to read re-released version soon.

I already wrote about this movie in an anticipation, here:

http://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2017/05/hey-mom-talking-to-my-mother-670.html

As for ORIGINAL CONTENT, I know, I know. I promised original content today, but the entry on résumés and cover letters is not done yet. Maybe for Sunday. I am busting my rump on work (grading and running classes), packing, selling a house, buying a house, preparing to learn more programming to make a career change, oh yeah, and daily chores like laundry and feeding the dogs.

This blog may go into cruise control for a while. I am trying to decide what I want to do.

For now, enjoy the Valerian previews.

These are amazing!


















+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 747 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1707.21 - 10:10

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #744 - Lori's Birthday 1971 - Throwback Thursday - conversations #14

Lori Marie birthday 1971 - two years old
Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #744 - Lori's Birthday 1971 - Throwback Thursday - conversations #14

Hi Mom,

I am having lunch with Lori again today, and so I am featuring her in today's Throwback photo, which I am pretty sure I did not share as the main photo in a Throwback Thursdays yet in my 744 posts. But as I was selecting a photo, I realized that my record keeping process is not great. I need to overhaul how I track the photos that I have featured, and I do not want to invest that time right now.

Things are happening, Mom. Lots of things with the house, the sale of the house, the new house, the move, packing, and more.

I reminded of a line from Radiohead's "The Tourist" off OK Computer: "Hey man, slow down..."

This is a short one because it's a day late, and I don't want to stop my routine of Throwbacks.

I had considered a different post, a share, just because I am pressed for time.

But the original idea for the blog is that I would keep the posts short, you know?

And doesn't the picture speak for itself?

See the cake made in the shape of and decorated like a school bus? Lori was obsessed with school buses at that age. Mom you look really tired and caught off-guard. I like pictures in which you are not aware the picture is being taken. I am wearing a shirt decorated with a picture of David Cassidy.

I like seeing all the things you did for decorating, Mom. Raggedy Ann table settings. Very nice. Brings back good memories. There's Lori's tea party table and chair behind me.

There's some things here that make me wonder if this is really 1971, but I am pretty sure that's the date on the photo.

The curtains you made are still up and not yet replaced. And this photo is before the addition that added the entry and replaced that front door. Also, above your head and the light fixture, I believe that's the bottom corner of the art print hanging in my kitchen.

Thanks, Mom.

More soon.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 746 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1707.20 - 10:10

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #743 - Mastering Git and Git Hub

20 tips for mastering Git and GitHub


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #743 - Mastering Git and Git Hub

Hi Mom,

This is what I am doing tomorrow. I am setting up my own Git Hub to show off the code I have written to future employers.

Short post today. Lots going on. Original content the next two days, though. Conversations tomorrow and then, I hope, my résumés post on Friday. I have been making steady progress on résumés each day. I should be ready.

But tomorrow I set up a Git Hub account and load student code for prospective employers to see.

I could dress this up with more pictures, but, oh well... that's a lot of work.

Mom, I know it's not too exciting for you (or many of my readers), but expect more and more computer-related posts. Remember, this is not my teaching but my study.

FROM - http://www.infoworld.com/article/3205884/application-development/20-tips-for-mastering-git-and-github.html

20 tips for mastering Git and GitHub






The programming world's favorite distributed version control system also lets you find, share, and improve code. Here's how to make Git and GitHub work better for you






While there are dozens of get-started guides for Git, and GitHub offers a number of guides of its own, it’s still not easy to find a collection of useful tips for developers who want to work smarter with Git and GitHub. Let’s fix that.
For those of you who are unfamiliar with Git or GitHub, the next few paragraphs will give you enough background to understand the tips. We’ll list about a dozen useful resources at the end of this article.





Git is a distributed version control system, originally written by Linus Torvalds in 2005 for and with help from the Linux kernel community. I’m not here to sell you on Git, so I’ll spare you the spiel about how fast and small and flexible and popular it is, but you should know that when you clone a Git repository (“repo,” for short), you get the entire version history on your own computer, not just a snapshot from one branch at one time.
Git started as a command-line tool, befitting its origin in the Linux kernel community. You can still use the Git command line, if you like, but you don’t have to. In particular, if you use GitHub as your host, you can use the free GitHub client on Windows or Mac. On the other hand, the Git command line will work for any host, and it comes pre-installed on most Mac and Linux systems.








Only you can decide whether you are most comfortable using the command line or a native client with a graphical user interface. If you like a GUI, in addition to the GitHub client (Windows and Mac), you might want to consider SourceTree (Windows and Mac, free), TortoiseGit(Windows only, free), and Gitbox (Mac only, $14.99). Or you can use an editor or IDE that supports Git internally (see tip No. 11).

Git/GitHub tip No. 1: Clone almost anything

There are many interesting projects available from GitHub and other public Git repositories that you can clone freely to your own computer. Why would you want to do that? One reason is to learn something about coding style, practice, and tools in a language of interest, including commit log commenting style (see tip No. 4). A second reason is to learn how a given project accomplishes its goals. A third reason, should the licensing both permit you to do so and make sense for your purposes, would be to incorporate the project into your own endeavor or product. Double-check the license, by the way, so that you don’t run into compliance issues later on.
The definition of git clone from the manual page:
Clones a repository into a newly created directory, creates remote-tracking branches for each branch in the cloned repository (visible using git branch -r), and creates and checks out an initial branch that is forked from the cloned repository’s currently active branch.
After the clone, a plain git fetch without arguments will update all the remote-tracking branches, and a git pull without arguments will in addition merge the remote master branch into the current master branch, if any.

Git/GitHub tip No. 2: Pull frequently

One of the easiest ways to make a mess for yourself with Git (and indeed, with any version control system) is to allow files to get out of sync. If you git pull frequently, you will keep your copy of the repo up to date, and you will have the opportunity to merge your changed code with others’ changes while the merging is easy to understand and accomplish—ideally, when it’s so easy that it can be done automatically. A corollary of this tip is to watch your project status. Many Git clients will automatically show you when you need to update to stay current.

Git/GitHub tip No. 3: Commit early and often

A commit is a granular update to a project, which includes one or more changes to one or more files. Think of it as a record of a unit of work completed, which can be applied to or removed from the project as a logical whole. Do commit every logical change you complete, even before testing it. Commits only apply to your local repository. See tips No. 4 and 5 for corollaries to this tip.
The definition of git commit from the manual page:
Stores the current contents of the index in a new commit along with a log message from the user describing the changes.

Git/GitHub tip No. 4: Comment your commits as you would have others comment theirs

There are 10 kinds of coders: Those who comment their commits, and those who don’t. (Old joke. Hint: What base am I using?)
I freely admit to being a stickler for good commit log messages. I set up my repositories to require messages for every commit, and I’ve been known to send out annoyed late-night messages when commits land with logs on the order of “xx.” If you’re the kind of developer who thinks (1) the code should speak for itself and (2) the in-line comments are way more important than the change logs, try cloning a repository you’ve never seen before and identifying the recent commit that may have caused the latest issue posted without reading all the code. As you can see, accurate commit logs are double-plus good.

Git/GitHub tip No. 5: Push when your changes are tested

The worst Git-related bug I’ve ever had the misfortune to know about happened when an outsourcing company switched from Subversion but didn’t train its developers on the difference between distributed source control and centralized source control. About a month later, the project developed weird bugs that nobody could seem to track down. At the daily stand-up meetings, the developers responsible for the area of the application that was misbehaving would protest, “I fixed that two weeks ago!” or accuse another developer of not bothering to pull the changes they had so carefully checked in.
Eventually, someone identified the problem and taught all the developers how and when to push their commits: In short, whenever the commits test successfully in a local build. Then the company did a two-day-long merge fest before being able to build and deploy the updated, integrated product.

Git/GitHub tip No. 6: Branch freely

One of the biggest advantages Git has over some other version-control systems is that merging usually works well, at least partly because Git automatically chooses the best common ancestor to use for a merge. Most software developers need to start creating branches in their projects more often. It should be a routine daily occurrence, not the subject of an anguished all-hands strategy meeting. The likelihood is that, when the branch project is complete, accepted, and ready to move into the main project, the merge will not present any insurmountable problems.
I know that takes some adjustment, especially if you’ve been stuck in a company that does source code control with CVS. But try it. It’s a whole lot better than having customers accidentally see your unfinished experimental code when the trunk project has to be published because of a breaking bug. (This article explains basic branching and merging well.)

Git/GitHub tip No. 7: Merge carefully

While merges with Git usually work well, if you do them without thinking, you can occasionally encounter difficulty. Step one is to make sure you have no uncommitted changes. From the git merge manual page:
Before applying outside changes, you should get your own work in good shape and committed locally, so it will not be clobbered if there are conflicts. See also git-stash.
Also see tip No. 8.
Even if it all goes south during a git merge, you aren’t hosed:
If you tried a merge which resulted in complex conflicts and want to start over, you can recover with git merge —abort.
The follow-on command to git merge is usually git mergetool, assuming you like to use a GUI for merging. If you’d prefer the old-school method, you can edit the files in conflict with your favorite programming editor, fully remove the <<<<<<<=======, and >>>>>>> lines, save the revised files, and git add each file you fixed.

Git/GitHub tip No. 8: Stash before switching branches

A software developer’s workflow is rarely linear. Users have the gall to report bugs, managers have the audacity to prioritize tickets other than the one you picked to work on, and you yourself might change your mind about what you want to do.
There you are, with three files committed for a release, and a fourth file in a changed but non-working state. (The git status command will tell you all of this if you don’t happen to remember where you were.) All of a sudden you need to work on a bug fix in a production version. You need to switch branches pronto, but you can’t. Your working directory is dirty and you have two hours of work you don’t want to lose.
Enter git stash. Voilà! Now you have all of your changes stored in a WIP (work in progress) branch, and you can switch to the production branch from your clean directory. When you’re done with that, switch back to where you were with git stash apply.

Git/GitHub tip No. 9: Use gists to share snippets and pastes

GitHub “gists”—shared code snippets—are not a Git feature, but they use Git. All gists are Git repositories, and GitHub Gist makes it easy to share them. You can search Gist for public gists by topic, programming language, forked status, and starred status. You can also create secret gists and share them by URL.

Git/GitHub tip No. 10: Explore GitHub

Many interesting open source projects have repositories on GitHub. Explore GitHub provides a browsing interface to find some of them, but mostly it’s easier to type a few letters of the project’s name in the search box to find its repos. For example, type jq or back or ang to find three of the major open source JavaScript frameworks.

Git/GitHub tip No. 11: Contribute to open source projects

As long as you’re browsing open source projects, why not contribute to them? It isn’t as hard as you might think, and you’ll learn a lot. For example, you could clone the jquery/jquery (jQuery Core) project, and browse through README.MD. Near the top you’ll see:
In the spirit of open source software development, jQuery always encourages community code contribution. To help you get started and before you jump into writing code, be sure to read these important contribution guidelines thoroughly...
That’s followed by three links. The first of the three will get you started fairly quickly. Not every open source project lays out the plan so clearly, but they all try.
Understand the difference between being a contributor and a committer. A contributor has signed the required agreements and made a contribution available to the project. A committer is empowered to actually commit the proffered contribution to the project repository. Because there will be a delay while a committer tests your contribution and you won’t want to tie up your master branch, you should make your changes in another branch (see tip No. 6) before sending out a pull request (see tip No. 16).

Git/GitHub tip No. 12: Use editors and IDEs that “git it”

If you’re barreling along on an edit only to discover, when you go to check it in, that someone else has been working on the same code as you have, you’re likely to become frustrated. You can avoid or at least minimize that frustration by using an editor or IDE that integrates Git and actually tells you that the code you’re viewing has new commits that you should pull, and what the new commits are supposed to accomplish.

Git/GitHub tip No. 13: Fork a repo

Forking a repository means creating your own writable server copy of a repo—that is, creating a fork in the road. Recall that we clone a repo (see tip No. 1) to make our own client copy of it. If it’s a public repo for which we do not have commit privileges (see tip No. 11), then the easiest way to contribute our changes is to first commit them to our own fork of the repo on the server via the fork button on the original GitHub project. Then we can issue a pull request (see tip No. 16) to the owners of the forked repo so that they can test and possibly use our contribution. It’s confusing at first, but it gets easier. See, for instance, this book section on contributing to a small public project.

Git/GitHub tip No. 14: Watch projects

When you fork a project, you’ll most likely want to know what’s happening in the upstream project. If so, watch the repo. If the update chatter annoys you, unwatch it. If you notice changes that affect you, fetch and merge the upstream commits.

–– ADVERTISEMENT ––

Git/GitHub tip No. 15: Follow friends

GitHub suggests that you follow GitHub employees “in a non-creepy way.” You should also follow people from projects that interest you, and that might lead you to other projects that interest you. I followed dmethvin on GitHub—but that’s not creepy since we’ve worked together on and off since he was at PC Tech Journal, and now he’s president of the jQuery Foundation.

Git/GitHub tip No. 16: Send pull requests

In tip No. 13, we talked about forking a GitHub repository. The way to get the upstream repository (the one you forked from to make yours) to incorporate some or all of your changes is to send them a pull request, following this guide.

Git/GitHub tip No. 17: Create and resolve issues

All software has bugs. Many software projects use a separate bug-tracking system, but some use the Issues feature in GitHub. You can be useful to a project by reporting an issue, and even more useful by solving one.

Git/GitHub tip No. 18: Write informative README pages

In tip No. 11, I sent you to the README page of jquery/jquery to find out about the project. Write good README pages for your projects, and you won’t regret it.
README has been an established convention in software development since at least the 1960s, when I saw my first one printed out IN ALL CAPS on the green-and-white paper that was wrapping a stack of Hollerith cards intended to be run on an IBM 1640. I saw many more in the 1970s, on every conceivable media and operating system, when I worked on DEC minicomputers and large IBM mainframes. See also REAMDE.

Git/GitHub tip No. 19: Use Markdown

Early README files IN ALL CAPS were more than a little basic. The current standard for formatting README files is Markdown, specifically GitHub Flavored Markdown. I used to see README files in HTML, but the practice seems to be fading.

Git/GitHub tip No. 20: Convert your older repos to Git

Of all the tips I’ve listed, this one might be the hardest to implement, both technically and politically. Politically it’s hard because programmers are by nature conservative about their tools. That needs to be addressed with training (see tip No. 5).
It’s technically hard to convert big, old repositories with millions of lines of code, tens of thousands of commits, and thousands of tags because the processes for this use a metric ton of memory. I have had decade-old CVS repositories that would only convert on large or extralarge Amazon EC2 instances, and they still took days for the conversion to complete. If you’re converting from Subversion, try using svn2git. If you’re converting from CVS, consider git -cvsimport and cvs2git.
Resources








+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 745 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1707.19 - 10:10

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #742 - Drinking Coffee is Healthy, prolongs life






my favorite coffee mug
Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #742 - Drinking Coffee is Healthy, prolongs life

Hi Mom,

I had planned some original content on résumés and cover letters today but that's not going to happen.

Instead, I bring you this very good news about coffee.

Not covfefe.

Never covfefe.

I knew I was on to something when I wanted to keep drinking coffee even after my doctor told me to cut it down or out.

I did quit once for over six months but less than a year, but then I went back and have not considered quitting again.

Life is too short.

Coffee is my operating system.




FROM HERE - http://www.kurzweilai.net/drinking-coffee-associated-with-lower-risk-of-death-from-all-causes-study-finds



Drinking coffee associated with lower risk of death from all causes, study finds
July 17, 2017



People who drink around three cups of coffee a day may live longer than non-coffee drinkers, a landmark study has found.
The findings — published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine — come from the largest study of its kind, in which scientists analyzed data from more than half a million people across 10 European countries to explore the effect of coffee consumption on risk of mortality.
Researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and Imperial College London found that higher levels of coffee consumption were associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes, particularly from circulatory diseases and diseases related to the digestive tract.
“We found that higher coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, and specifically for circulatory diseases, and digestive diseases,” said lead author Marc Gunter of the IARC and formerly at Imperial’s School of Public Health. “Importantly, these results were similar across all of the 10 European countries, with variable coffee drinking habits and customs. Our study also offers important insights into the possible mechanisms for the beneficial health effects of coffee.”


Healthier livers, better glucose control
Using data from the EPIC study (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition), the group analysed data from 521,330 people from over the age of 35 from 10 EU countries, including the UK, France, Denmark and Italy. People’s diets were assessed using questionnaires and interviews, with the highest level of coffee consumption (by volume) reported in Denmark (900 mL per day) and lowest in Italy (approximately 92 mL per day). Those who drank more coffee were also more likely to be younger, to be smokers, drinkers, eat more meat and less fruit and vegetables.
After 16 years of follow up, almost 42,000 people in the study had died from a range of conditions including cancer, circulatory diseases, heart failure and stroke. Following careful statistical adjustments for lifestyle factors such as diet and smoking, the researchers found that the group with the highest consumption of coffee had a lower risk for all causes of death, compared to those who did not drink coffee.
They found that decaffeinated coffee had a similar effect.
In a subset of 14,000 people, they also analyzed metabolic biomarkers, and found that coffee drinkers may have healthier livers overall and better glucose control than non-coffee drinkers.
According to the group, more research is needed to find out which of the compounds in coffee may be giving a protective effect or potentially benefiting health.* Other avenues of research to explore could include intervention studies, looking at the effect of coffee drinking on health outcomes.
However, Gunter noted that “due to the limitations of observational research, we are not at the stage of recommending people to drink more or less coffee. That said, our results suggest that moderate coffee drinking is not detrimental to your health, and that incorporating coffee into your diet could have health benefits.”
The study was funded by the European Commission Directorate General for Health and Consumers and the IARC.
* Coffee contains a number of compounds that can interact with the body, including caffeine, diterpenes and antioxidants, and the ratios of these compounds can be affected by the variety of methods used to prepare coffee.



Abstract of Coffee Drinking and Mortality in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study

Background: The relationship between coffee consumption and mortality in diverse European populations with variable coffee preparation methods is unclear.
Objective: To examine whether coffee consumption is associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.
Design: Prospective cohort study.
Setting: 10 European countries.
Participants: 521 330 persons enrolled in EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition).
Measurements: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. The association of coffee consumption with serum biomarkers of liver function, inflammation, and metabolic health was evaluated in the EPIC Biomarkers subcohort (n = 14 800).
Results: During a mean follow-up of 16.4 years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Compared with nonconsumers, participants in the highest quartile of coffee consumption had statistically significantly lower all-cause mortality (men: HR, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.82 to 0.95]; P for trend < 0.001; women: HR, 0.93 [CI, 0.87 to 0.98]; P for trend = 0.009). Inverse associations were also observed for digestive disease mortality for men (HR, 0.41 [CI, 0.32 to 0.54]; P for trend < 0.001) and women (HR, 0.60 [CI, 0.46 to 0.78]; P for trend < 0.001). Among women, there was a statistically significant inverse association of coffee drinking with circulatory disease mortality (HR, 0.78 [CI, 0.68 to 0.90]; P for trend < 0.001) and cerebrovascular disease mortality (HR, 0.70 [CI, 0.55 to 0.90]; P for trend = 0.002) and a positive association with ovarian cancer mortality (HR, 1.31 [CI, 1.07 to 1.61]; P for trend = 0.015). In the EPIC Biomarkers subcohort, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower serum alkaline phosphatase; alanine aminotransferase; aspartate aminotransferase; γ-glutamyltransferase; and, in women, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a), and glycated hemoglobin levels.
Limitations: Reverse causality may have biased the findings; however, results did not differ after exclusion of participants who died within 8 years of baseline. Coffee-drinking habits were assessed only once.
Conclusion:
Coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes. This relationship did not vary by country.
Primary Funding Source:
European Commission Directorate-General for Health and Consumers and International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Abstract of Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations

Background: Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced risk for death in prospective cohort studies; however, data in nonwhites are sparse.
Objective: To examine the association of coffee consumption with risk for total and cause-specific death.
Design: The MEC (Multiethnic Cohort), a prospective population-based cohort study established between 1993 and 1996.
Setting: Hawaii and Los Angeles, California.
Participants: 185 855 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites aged 45 to 75 years at recruitment.
Measurements: Outcomes were total and cause-specific mortality between 1993 and 2012. Coffee intake was assessed at baseline by means of a validated food-frequency questionnaire.
Results: 58 397 participants died during 3 195 484 person-years of follow-up (average follow-up, 16.2 years). Compared with drinking no coffee, coffee consumption was associated with lower total mortality after adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders (1 cup per day: hazard ratio [HR], 0.88 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.91]; 2 to 3 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.79 to 0.86]; ≥4 cups per day: HR, 0.82 [CI, 0.78 to 0.87]; Pfor trend < 0.001). Trends were similar between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Significant inverse associations were observed in 4 ethnic groups; the association in Native Hawaiians did not reach statistical significance. Inverse associations were also seen in never-smokers, younger participants (<55 a="" among="" and="" associations="" cancer="" chronic="" deaths="" diabetes="" disease.="" disease="" due="" end="" examined="" for="" had="" heart="" inverse="" kidney="" not="" observed="" p="" points="" previously="" reported="" respiratory="" stroke="" those="" to="" were="" who="" years="">
Limitation: Unmeasured confounding and measurement error, although sensitivity analysis suggested that neither was likely to affect results.
Conclusion: Higher consumption of coffee was associated with lower risk for death in African Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and whites.
Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute.


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 744 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1707.18 - 10:10

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #741 - Happy Birthday Satchel, a five-year old Beagle

Satchel Paige Tower - day two of adoption - age approx 6 weeks - 1208.25
Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #741 - Happy Birthday Satchel, a five-year old Beagle

Hi Mom,

I interrupt my usual routine, the usual MUSICAL MONDAY, for this special blog post announcement.

Happy Birthday to my oh so special puppy dog, her Booness, duh Boo Boo, Smartest dog on the planet earth and beyond (no, really, don't argue), Satchel Paige Tower, who turns five years old today July 17th, 2017.

To celebrate, I dropped Ellory at Camp Fido daycare, and I took Satchel to the Asylum Lake Nature Preserve for a walk, just for her, with her Dad (that's me), solo, no Ellory.

This seems to be a thing. She enjoys her Ellory free time, but she also seems to miss Ellory. Right now, she's camped out in Ellory's crate.

She does that a lot, especially when Ellory's not here.



Here's my posts about our walk.



Here's Satchel tired from the walk.






She's exhausted, but she's happy.


There's video!!




This is a quickie entry because I have a lot of work to do.

I do have a Satchel CATEGORY - here at this link. Click and view all the Satchel posts (or posts that feature Satchel) in reverse order. I am up to 741 total posts for the blog, including this one, and I only have 18 posts featuring Satchel (unless I missed some), so that's not enough.

Liesel considers Satchel her soulmate, which I think is very true. They have an uncanny bond.

I also feel that soul-deep connection with Satchel, and we share a bond, too, but it's different.

I devoted myself to enjoying Ellory as a puppy more because I regret not spending as much time and energy (and photos and videos) on Satchel as a puppy. Her puppy time seemed to go so fast... AND now she's five years old.

She needs to out live both of us.

I am not going to go nuts, but here's just a few photos of my great love Satchel the boo.

I know you love this stuff, Mom, but for other readers, thank you for tuning in.

PHOTO GALLERY

Satchel 1304.25

Satchel 1208.25

Satchel 1211.07 post first day Camp Fido via Liesel

Satchel by Liesel 1305.17a

Satchel and Vespers cuddlin together 1407.11

Satchel by Liesel 1612.11

Satchel by Liesel 1612.17

Satchel via Piper 1211.23



Satchel doing special time - 1506.08

Satchel with Kong 1702.08

PICKING Liesel up from work - Satchel on car dash 1209.24

Satchel and Ellory via Liesel 1701.15

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = ## days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - date - time

NOTE on time: When I post late, I had been posting at 7:10 a.m. because Google is on Pacific Time, and so this is really 10:10 EDT. However, it still shows up on the blog in Pacific time. So, I am going to start posting at 10:10 a.m. Pacific time, intending this to be 10:10 Eastern time. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom. But I am not going back and changing all the 7:10 a.m. times. But I will run this note for a while. Mom, you know that I am posting at 10:10 a.m. often because this is the time of your death.