Hey, Mom! The Explanation.

Here's the permanent dedicated link to my first Hey, Mom! post and the explanation of the feature it contains.

Monday, November 12, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1361 - Hanging on in Quiet Desperation is the InDiscipline Way mix for Musical Monday for 1811.12


A Sense of Doubt blog post #1361 - Hanging on in Quiet Desperation is the InDiscipline Way mix for Musical Monday for 1811.12

Hello readers,

I continue to use this blog as a staging area for music I want to play in the class room. This one started with King Crimson and the first song, that song by Mogwai, which I first featured in my re-share (with all due credit to) of Kieron Gillen's best of 2016 playlist.

But then, as it always happens YOU TUBE intervenes and shares music that's just perfect and also, sometimes, a new discovery like Orkestra Obsolete using 1930s instruments to play New Order's "Blue Monday."

But then I expand with some artists I want to talk about, like Kate Bush, Devo, Peter Gabriel, Brian Eno, and Talking Heads. But then You Tube says "what about Moby?" And those two cuts seem to fit. And then I am with my wife and she plays an old Gang of Four track, and I remember how much I love Entertainment, the first album from 1979.

The crowning touch from which I modify a lyric for the title comes from Pink Floyd's "Time," one of the most relevant songs year after year of my whole life, and I thought it was true and real and well-targeted when I first heard it at the age of EIGHTEEN.





But, just BY THE WAY, here’s the link to that post of my most listened to albums (which is like favorites…sort of…)


This has become a killer mix.

It all started because my students had a "quiz" (some might call it a test), and I wanted to make a point about "DISCIPLINE" and connect to King Crimson's album Discipline, which also makes the companion point about "Indiscipline," which is the negation of discipline. Say what? Check out the song. Two versions.

All this music keeps on giving to my life over and over and over.

Video player pod at the end of the blog entry. URL link to the mix in the title below.

ENJOY.





Hanging on in Quiet Desperation is the InDiscipline Way mix for Musical Monday for 1811.12



























































+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.12 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1227 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1360 - Thank you for your Service - Veteran's Day

My Dad - US Army and National Guard - 1960
A Sense of Doubt blog post #1360 - Thank you for your Service - Veteran's Day


Just this. Thank you @scalzi.






+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.11 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1226 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1359 - Whitman, Democracy, and Feminism


A Sense of Doubt blog post #1359 - Whitman, Democracy, and Feminism

At Portland Book Festival Today... so, just this.

Walt Whitman on Donald Trump, How Literature Bolsters Democracy, and Why a Robust Society Is a Feminist Society

“America, if eligible at all to downfall and ruin, is eligible within herself, not without… Always inform yourself; always do the best you can; always vote.”

Walt Whitman on Donald Trump, How Literature Bolsters Democracy, and Why a Robust Society Is a Feminist Society
In 1855, Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) made his debut as a poet and self-published Leaves of Grass. Amid the disheartening initial reception of pervasive indifference pierced by a few shrieks of criticism, the young poet received an extraordinary letter of praise and encouragement from his idol —Ralph Waldo Emerson, the era’s most powerful literary tastemaker. This gesture of tremendous generosity was a creative life-straw for the dispirited artist, who soon became one of the nation’s most celebrated writers and went on to be remembered as America’s greatest poet.
In the late 1860, working as a federal clerk and approaching his fiftieth birthday, Whitman grew increasingly concerned that America’s then-young democracy had grown in danger of belying the existential essentials of the human spirit. He voiced his preoccupations in a masterful and lengthy essay titled Democratic Vistas, later included in the indispensable Library of America volume Walt Whitman: Poetry and Prose (free ebook | public library).
Both Whitman’s spirited critique of American democracy and his proposed solution — which calls for an original and ennobling national body of literature as the means to cultivating the people’s mentality, character, and ideals — ring remarkably true today, perhaps even truer amid our modern disenchantment and dearth of idealism, accentuated by the spectacle of an election season.
waltwhitman
Literature, Whitman argues, constructs the scaffolding of society’s values and “has become the only general means of morally influencing the world” — its archetypal characters shape the moral character and political ideals of a culture. Long after the political structures of the ancient world have crumbled, he reminds us, what remains of Ancient Greece and Rome and the other great civilizations is their literature. He writes:
At all times, perhaps, the central point in any nation, and that whence it is itself really sway’d the most, and whence it sways others, is its national literature, especially its archetypal poems. Above all previous lands, a great original literature is surely to become the justification and reliance, (in some respects the sole reliance,) of American democracy. Few are aware how the great literature penetrates all, gives hue to all, shapes aggregates and individuals, and, after subtle ways, with irresistible power, constructs, sustains, demolishes at will.
[…]
In the civilization of to-day it is undeniable that, over all the arts, literature dominates, serves beyond all — shapes the character of church and school — or, at any rate, is capable of doing so. Including the literature of science, its scope is indeed unparallel’d.


Illustration by Allen Crawford from Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself

Lamenting the vacant materialism of consumer society, Whitman writes:
We had best look our times and lands searchingly in the face, like a physician diagnosing some deep disease. Never was there, perhaps, more hollowness at heart than at present, and here in the United States. Genuine belief seems to have left us. The underlying principles of the States are not honestly believ’d in, (for all this hectic glow, and these melodramatic screamings,) nor is humanity itself believ’d in.
[…]
Our New World democracy, however great a success in uplifting the masses out of their sloughs, in materialistic development, products, and in a certain highly-deceptive superficial popular intellectuality, is, so far, an almost complete failure in its social aspects, and in really grand religious, moral, literary, and esthetic results… In vain have we annex’d Texas, California, Alaska, and reach north for Canada and south for Cuba. It is as if we were somehow being endow’d with a vast and more and more thoroughly-appointed body, and then left with little or no soul.
[…]
To take expression, to incarnate, to endow a literature with grand and archetypal models — to fill with pride and love the utmost capacity, and to achieve spiritual meanings, and suggest the future — these, and these only, satisfy the soul. We must not say one word against real materials; but the wise know that they do not become real till touched by emotions, the mind.
The savior of the nation’s soul, Whitman insists, is not the politician but the artist:
Should some two or three really original American poets, (perhaps artists or lecturers,) arise, mounting the horizon like planets, stars of the first magnitude, that, from their eminence, fusing contributions, races, far localities, &c., together they would give more compaction and more moral identity, (the quality to-day most needed,) to these States, than all its Constitutions, legislative and judicial ties, and all its hitherto political, warlike, or materialistic experiences.


Art by Maurice Sendak from his 1993 masterwork We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, his darkest yet most hopeful book

In a sentiment that makes one shudder imagining what the poet would’ve made of Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy, Whitman writes:
I know nothing grander, better exercise, better digestion, more positive proof of the past, the triumphant result of faith in human kind, than a well-contested American national election.
[…]
America, it may be, is doing very well upon the whole, notwithstanding these antics of the parties and their leaders, these half-brain’d nominees, the many ignorant ballots, and many elected failures and blatherers. It is the dilettantes, and all who shirk their duty, who are not doing well… America, if eligible at all to downfall and ruin, is eligible within herself, not without.
The sole antidote, Whitman reminds us, lies in our own hands and the ballots they hold — in not shirking our duty as voters. He shares his advice to the young:
Enter more strongly yet into politics… Always inform yourself; always do the best you can; always vote.


Illustration by Allen Crawford from Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself

The role of government and those in power, he argues, is not to rule by authority alone — the mark of dictatorship rather than democracy — but “to train communities … beginning with individuals and ending there again, to rule themselves.” Above all, the task of democratic leadership is to bind “all nations, all men, of however various and distant lands, into a brotherhood, a family.” Many decades before women won the right to vote and long before Nikola Tesla’s feminist vision for humanity, Whitman argues that a robust democracy is one in which women are fully empowered and included in that “brotherhood” on equal terms:
I have sometimes thought … that the sole avenue and means of a reconstructed sociology depended, primarily, on a new birth, elevation, expansion, invigoration of woman… Great, great, indeed, far greater than they know, is the sphere of women.
Reflecting on the perils of inequality in any guise, for any group, he adds:
Of all dangers to a nation, as things exist in our day, there can be no greater one than having certain portions of the people set off from the rest by a line drawn — they not privileged as others, but degraded, humiliated, made of no account.
The supreme tool of reconstructing a more equal society, Whitman asserts, is literature — a body of literature that gives voice to the underrepresented, that elevates and expands and invigorates their spirits by mirroring them back to themselves as indelibly worthy of belonging to society. (I’m reminded of a contemporary counterpart: Jacqueline Woodson on why she writes characters of color.)
Whitman writes:
A new founded literature, not merely to copy and reflect existing surfaces, or pander to what is called taste … but a literature underlying life, religious, consistent with science, handling the elements and forces with competent power, teaching and training men — and, as perhaps the most precious of its results, achieving the entire redemption of woman … and thus insuring to the States a strong and sweet Female Race… — is what is needed.
But Whitman’s most pertinent point is that true dedication to democracy isn’t a mere fleeting fixture of election season. Rather, it permeates the very fabric of society and must be upheld in every aspect of our lives, at every moment — something best effected by literature:
Far, far, indeed, stretch, in distance, our Vistas! How much is still to be disentangled, freed! How long it takes to make this American world see that it is, in itself, the final authority and reliance! Did you, too, O friend, suppose democracy was only for elections, for politics, and for a party name? I say democracy is only of use there that it may pass on and come to its flower and fruits in manners, in the highest forms of interaction between men, and their beliefs — in religion, literature, colleges, and schools — democracy in all public and private life.
[…]
The literature, songs, esthetics, &c., of a country are of importance principally because they furnish the materials and suggestions of personality for the women and men of that country, and enforce them in a thousand effective ways.
Democratic Vistas is a stirring and magnificently timely read in its entirety, as is all of Whitman’s Poetry and Prose. Complement it with James Baldwin and Margaret Mead on reimagining democracy for a post-consumerist culture, Carl Sagan on science as a tool of democracy, and Adrienne Rich on capitalism and freedom, then revisit Whitman’s raunchy ode to New York City and this beautiful illustrated tribute to his “Song of Myself.”
SOURCE: BRAIN PICKINGS - WHITMAN & DEMOCRACY


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.10 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1225 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Friday, November 9, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1358 - Portland Book Festival and a Problem with Time


A Sense of Doubt blog post #1358 - Portland Book Festival and a Problem with Time

I am going backwards in time. I am convinced of it.

I went to the Portland Book Festival and got nerdy about books with thousands of people, including two of my new colleagues at Lower Columbia College in Longview, which is such a happy place!

But what's this? If I went to the Book Fest Saturday the 10th, how are these pictures here on the blog for Friday the 9th?

How does time work?

Do all moments exist at once?






Oh, and I voted last week...


Note the RAINBOW FLAGS...








Pre-Registration - this photo was taken 1811.09...


Creepy...?



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.09 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1224 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1357 - The problem with featuring Mopop's Marvel Exhibit

I am so happy to have caught this photo of all these kids sitting
under the Ms. Marvel statue! This is what the MARVEL
exhibit is all about!!
A Sense of Doubt blog post #1357 - The problem with featuring Mopop's Marvel Exhibit

On October 6th, 2018, I went to the Marvel Comics exhibit at MoPop (Museum of Pop Culture) in Seattle, and I took 240 photos.

I was so excited after spending a couple of hours at the exhibit that I was just going to make a HUGE blog post and share ALL the photos. But, yeah, that's A LOT of photos. So, I never shared more than a couple, which I did here:

https://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2018/10/hey-mom-talking-to-my-mother-1123-kong.html

But I have not yet figured out how to share all the photos. I considered doing a selection (10-20) and then a jump break (or even a separate entry) and stashing all the photos after the break or in the post that does not get pushed to social media. But still, did I mention the NUMBER of photos?

And then because of grading, work, tests, and the PORTLAND BOOK FESTIVAL, I fell behind on posting blog entries. My go to for catching up is either easy and quick shares of other people's content, like this

https://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2018/10/a-sense-of-doubt-blog-post-1330-its-not.html

Or this one, which was one of my recent favorites and one I will make my students read from now on:


https://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2018/09/a-sense-of-doubt-blog-post-1313-this-is.html

OR I post reprints of previous HEY MOM or even T-SHIRTS blog entries, like this HEY MOM:

https://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2018/09/hey-mom-talking-to-my-mother-1117.html

OR this T-SHIRT:

https://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2018/10/hey-mom-talking-to-my-mother-1126-t.html


So, yeah, the plans for catching up.

But then it occurred to me that I could do quickies with original content and just a bit of text, like this one. It's the method I had in mind when I created the blog. And I could do a very, very small selection of MoPop photos with captions pretty fast.

So this is that, and here we go.


Hulk - near the entrance

The Mighty Marvel Bullpen of the 1970s

I had to photo this as I was a reader and a subscriber of Writer's Digest for
many years but long after this issue came out!

Jack Kirby's desk

Jack Kirby and family Hanukkah card


Original Steve Ditko (RIP) art from Amazing Fantasy  #15
in which we see Spider-Man in his costume for the first time

close up of Gene Colan cover for Iron Man #1 - one of my favorites of all time!

Close up of HUGE Vision display from the John Buscema art - FAVE

John Busceme original art - Silver Surfer #1

Me - taking a photo with Doctor Strange movie costume in the background

Original art - Frank Miller - Bullseye kills Elektra - Daredevil #181

I LOVE IRON FIST!! I have always loved John Byrne. Great image!

ALEX ROSS ART - wow just wow

Two ever-lovin' blue-eyed things

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.08 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1223 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #1129 - America is Waiting - again - a music mix and commentary content


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #1129 - America is Waiting - again - a music mix and commentary content

Hi Mom,

I HOLD THE LINE!

This post is a special Hey Mom reprint on a day I usually don't feature such content, but after yesterday's election, I felt that this message was all the more important.

EDIT - 1811.09 - I try not to edit posts once they are published, but some times I do. If I see a typo (or someone tells me about a typo) I fix it. Given that I try to maintain a daily publication schedule, the work is not always thoroughly edited and revised. In fact, such labor would be a bit counter to my process. This blog activity allows me some freedom to just... let it all hang out, so to speak.

AND, most certainly, I have NEVER edited a blog post when I am reprinting it as I have done here.

But I am using these blog posts as starters in my classes, and I needed to add the Police's "Too Much Information," especially having found this very cool video for it. But when I was looking at the mix, I decided that the videos needed to be re-arranged somewhat, and so I have not only edited the mix on You Tube, but I have edited the reprint of the original mix here. I do not intend to go back and edit the original blog post for the mix. But I will add the new blog link for the reprint to the You Tube mix page.

I also had to change the name of the mix on You Tube as it was an early mix and I had titled it by the date first, so that made it very difficult to find in my list of mixes. It is now called:

AMERICA IS WAITING MUSICAL MONDAY FOR 1703.27

Here's the video player for the whole thing:




It's one of my shorter mixes. It consists of only 13 songs. I should get back to shorter mixes.

Before the reprint a message from the last great president and possibly one of the greatest ever, Barack Obama, and then comments by my good friend Chris Dilley published yesterday in the People's Food Co-Op of Kalamazoo weekly newsletter. BTW, and just because I am not sure I ever shared it on my blog before, I used to serve on the board of the co-op. It was my honor to serve, and one of the best things I have ever done in my life.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/11/07/obama-congratulates-house-democrats-971722




 Introduction

Hi everyone,

Happy voting day. I trust you have all voted.

Discourse in the US and our community right now is so challenging. We have been confronted with name-calling and insinuation-filled discourse everywhere we turn. It's hard, and it's disheartening.

Everyday at PFC we show up ready to engage in our work to create access to good food for all. For us that means doing the work in a way that celebrates good efforts and challenges us all to make areas rife with injustice better.

I sometimes get this comment: "Why should a grocery store and farmers markets be working on racism?" The easy answer, in a sense, is that our mission calls for it, "access for all." And we know that racism, sexism, gender identity oppression, and other ways we marginalize people and strip them of power, impede access to education, employment, wealth accumulation and healthcare, and they impede access to good food. The work PFC does in the community to create places filled with locally grown, love-filled, clean, fresh food, would be wasted if we didn't strive to make these places more and more open and inclusive of all the amazing people that Kalamazoo has within it.

As a straight, white male, I can often be blind to the impacts of racism, sexism, and many other oppressions are invisible. I try to challenge this privileged perspective every day, challenging my fragility in conversations about race, challenge myself to listen better - not to argue that people are misunderstanding intentions - but to really hear that people of color, women, LGBTQQIA+ folks, and many others are suffering disproportionately, in different ways, due to their identities. This cannot stand.

And we must continue to find our humanity, and that of those who we disagree with, so we can have a conversation that matters. Civility matters, even in the face of understandable rage and fear. We are still living beings, striving to be together on this planet.

So, on this evening, as we wait to see how the will of our community has shaped public service and ultimately public discourse through our choice in servants, I feel called to step further into the discomfort of this work, not away from it. I hope you will join me. We are so much stronger together, seeing past our differences. Engaging in real talk in respectful, inclusive ways is one tool we have in each of our control to make it a better world.

I hope you'll join me in stepping up and in, trying to do better every day, and being open to learning and growing through every interaction.

Thanks for listening. I wish you the best and hope to see you at the co-op very soon or at one of the final markets of the year. - Chris




Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #629 - America is Waiting, Musical Monday 1703.27

Hi Mom, I started this playlist two weeks ago while studying Calculus in Sangren, but then last week I came home sick.

I was going to keep this to just ten videos, like the Tree of Life in the Kabbalah, but then I decided to add the Kate Bush video, which seems very much in the theme of this set, and feeling that eleven videos is too odd and prime, I decided to add one more for an even dozen. When I went searching for just the right 12th video, I found the Killing Joke video that proved to be a great counter point to all the videos, the theme for which is "The State of the Hate Nation."

I mentioned "The State of the Hate Nation" in a recent blog post that I am very proud of that's about racism in comics: Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #627 - ASM#25 - Spider-Man pauses midfight to consider racist message. Please check it out if you haven't. I know you have been with me on this, Mom.

The Killing Joke video proved to be the perfect thing to cap off this set. The current nation seems to have a lot on common with the Reagan years of the 1980s. except the part where Trump is Putin of Russia's finger puppet. Can't really say Reagan and Bush were controlled by the Russians.

The central message here comes from the repeated lines in Byrne and Eno's great "America is Waiting" song that leads off the seminal masterpiece: My Life in the Bush of Ghosts:


"America is waiting for a message of some sort or another."

I am really proud of this set.

Great finds here, such as Sevdaliza, who came to my attention through those amazing algorithms of the Google-verse that's going to show me things that other people have liked who have liked what I have liked. She's amazing! Expect more Sevdaliza in future weeks.


The Google-verse also suggested that it was time to listen to Mogwai's "Ether," and though I featured that song in the masterful and amazingly best playlist so far this year --

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #573 - Kieron Gillen's Best of for 2016 - Musical Monday 1701.30

-- I took Google's suggestion and added it as I think it's a good message, a progression in this building theme created by these videos.

I was also trying to think of bands and tracks that felt like they should go together. Byrne and Eno made me think of Burial, which led me to NIN, which made Cabaret Voltaire a natural extension of those three.

I was trying not to double up, but then, I realized that there's a reason I want two cuts from My Life in the Bush of Ghosts and two from Cabaret Voltaire. That's just right.

Obviously, the Gil Scott Heron track is righteous and fits perfectly with "America is Waiting," but also especially perfect because it's the Bernie Sanders edition.

Some may say that the Peter Gabriel song seems like an outlier here, but listen to the lyrics.

As Gabriel claims it's a story of human rights told to him by an Apache Indian.

What could be more perfect as part of this collection of interrelated tunes?

"I hold the line."

LINK TO THE AMERICA IS WAITING PLAYLIST ON YOU TUBE HERE.



David Byrne & Brian Eno - "America is Waiting" from My Life in the Bush of Ghosts



Gil Scott Heron - "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" - from Soul of a Man





The Police - "Too Much Information" - from Ghost in the Machine - 1981



Burial - "Ghost Hardware"


Mogwai - "Ether"





Nine Inch Nails - "Closer"





David Byrne & Brian Eno - "The Jezebel Spirit" from My Life in the Bush of Ghosts





Sevdaliza - "HUMAN"





Kate Bush - "Cloudbursting" - from Hounds of Love





Peter Gabriel - "San Jacinto"





Cabaret Voltaire - "Ghostalk"





Cabaret Voltaire - "What Is Real"





Killing Joke - "Eighties"





ORIGINAL - Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1703.27 - 10:10 my time (7:10 PDT)



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you, Mom.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 1222 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1811.07 - 10:10

NEW (written 1708.27) NOTE on time: I am now in the same time zone as Google! So, when I post at 10:10 a.m. PDT to coincide with the time of your death, Mom, I am now actually posting late, so it's really 1:10 p.m. EDT. But I will continue to use the time stamp of 10:10 a.m. to remember the time of your death, Mom. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom.