Hey, Mom! The Explanation.

Here's the permanent dedicated link to my first Hey, Mom! post and the explanation of the feature it contains.

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1257 - Land a Remote Job with Tech Skills

http://tinobusiness.com/goodbye-offices-keys-to-work-remotely-business-tips/
A Sense of Doubt blog post #1257 - Land a Remote Job with Tech Skills

Final grades due today, so just a share. But doesn't this image up top inspire?

Also, I like CODE ACADEMY!

FROM - https://news.codecademy.com/at-home-jobs-remote-work/

Use Tech Skills to Land a Remote Job


/INSIGHTS





When we asked our users why they wanted to learn to code, 25% of respondents said they started coding because they wanted to work remotely.
Why? Well, there are plenty of benefits to remote work, from the obvious (geographic flexibility; the freedom to structure your day however you’d like) to the more subtle (say goodbye to nightmarish daily commutes; “pajama pants” are just “pants,” if you’d like them to be).
While digging into the data, we learned that many open remote positions happen to be technical in nature, even if the role is traditionally “non-technical.”
So in this post, we’re going to dive a bit deeper and explain how the right combination of tech skills and work habits can help you work from anywhere you’d like.


kitchen-scroll



Remote Companies Explain How to Get a Remote Job

When considering how to land a remote job, the best people to ask are the ones hiring. Buffer, Invision, and Zapier all three fully-remote companies that have written about the qualities they look for when hiring a remote employee.
Buffer, a social media scheduling tool, has operated as a mostly remote company since its founding in 2010. In 2015, they made the switch to fully-remote. Joel Gascoigne, founder and CEO of Buffer, has written about the motivation for and results of that decision extensively in the years since.
What do they look for in new hires?
For one, certain soft skills can make a world of difference. Remote work has a tendency to amplify traditional business challenges—technology, communication, and productivity get tougher to deal with when you’re separated from the rest of your team. According to Gascoigne, new Buffer hires “need to be self-motivated and productive working at home, coffee shops or a co-working space.”

IMG_EmpoweredMarketer_B_OG


InVision, a product design and collaboration platform, and Zapier, a web app integration platform, are also successful, growing tech companies staffed by fully-remote teams. Both have echoedGascoigne’s preference—regardless of position, traits like experience working for startups and a hyper-communicative workstyle hold these teams together.
But there’s another skillset that these companies seek out in candidates for technical and non-technical positions alike.

Get the Job with Technical Skills

When I looked at open job listings at all three of these remote-only companies, I found another common requirement—tech skills, for just about every position.
For example, this line appears in the listing for a Partnership Manager position at Zapier:
API documentation is familiar territory. You're comfortable looking for and suggesting improvements to an integration based on reading through a tool's API docs.
A partnership marketer working in the same office as their product and engineering teams might not have to know the technical ins and outs of their company’s product, because getting an answer is a shoulder tap away. A remote marketer doesn’t have that luxury, so tech fluency is key.
A similar thread runs through InVision’s job listings. UX Researcher and Product Manager roles stress the importance of understanding “quantitative data analysis” and “complex technical challenges,” respectively.
In both cases, these skills are treated as a means to more effective communication across the team. Even if the UX Researcher or Product Manager won’t be analyzing data or solving technical challenges themselves, working remotely demands a comprehensive understanding of what your engineering, data, and design teams are doing in other parts of the world.

You Don’t Have to Be a Developer to Code Remotely

As software continues to eat the world, just about every role is becoming a technical role. With this shift has come a preponderance of positions characterized by work that can be done asynchronously, and technologies that support that work.
Nisha Garrigan is the co-founder of, and now a marketer and front-end developer at, Croissant. The app—run by a fully-remote team—grants users access to over 350 workspaces in nine cities around the world.
Prior to co-founding Croissant, though, Nisha was a marketer in a somewhat traditional capacity. She told me she enjoyed the job, but she began to realize she was on a track she “was not very passionate about.” She added, “I kept reading exciting news about various startups. I became enamored with the idea of being on a small, passionate team of people seeking to change the world with technology.”

croissant


On her search for a next step, she came to a pretty clear conclusion: “In general, it seemed like I would have many more job opportunities if I learned how to code.”
She started teaching herself to code, attending hackathons along the way to hone her skills. During this period, she got her “first taste of remote work.”
“It wasn’t motivating for me to work from my tiny Brooklyn apartment on the weekends, so I became one of those people you see at coffee shops busily tapping away on their laptops. I loved soaking up the good energy of other people and using that to fuel whatever projects I was working on.
“There was a really freeing feeling of working on projects I cared about, from wherever I wanted to. It was this feeling that actually inspired the idea behind the startup I’m working on now, Croissant.”

Why work remotely

Nisha’s story highlights one of the main reasons more people are gravitating to remote work—being in total control of where and when you work is empowering.
With the flexibility afforded by remote work, pursuing opportunities outside of the job in question becomes more realistic. That means furthering your education, building out a side project, or anything else that feels impossible to fit around the structure of a 9-to-5 job in a set location.
For parents, the benefits are innumerable. Be there before and after school, chauffeur to practices and rehearsals, and sit down together for dinner, all without missing a beat professionally.
For anyone whose geographic and career preferences don’t perfectly align—for example, having a spouse working in Europe and a job for a company based in San Francisco—remote work is a pretty appealing solution.

Don’t overlook the time and expense saved on commuting, either. Remote work can mean avoiding not just an hour by car or train, but avoiding a total uprooting of your life. That old trope of packing up and moving to the big city in search of opportunity doesn’t have to be a reality.
It’s now possible to learn tech skills from anywherecommunicate those skills, and then get a job that will allow you to work from anywhere.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1807.31 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1123 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.

Monday, July 30, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1256 - It's a Lovebeat - Musical Monday for 1807.30


A Sense of Doubt blog post #1256 - It's a Lovebeat - Musical Monday for 1807.30


So last week, when I posted HEY MOM #1102 - Falling off the Roof and First Concert Throwback Thursday for 1807.26, I used the power of the Internet to look up the date of my first rock concert, a David Cassidy solo performance at Pine Knob in Clarkston, Michigan on June 25, 1972.

And so, I decided to theme a whole mix for Musical Monday around my childhood bubble gum pop favourites.

I came of age in the 1970s and cut my musical teeth on the Partridge Family, David Cassidy, the Osmonds, the DeFranco Family, Donny and Marie Osmond, Michael Jackson and the Jackson Five, Bobby Sherman, the Brady Bunch, The Archies, the Monkees, and so many others.

As usual, my mix starts with a core -- David Cassidy and the Partridge Family -- and builds on that core of five tracks with others, such as the Osmonds and the Jackson Five though also Grand Funk, Cher, and Melanie.


Tiger Beat, 16, Right On, Fave, Dynamite, and probably a few others were in constant circulation at my house. I think I had a subscription to Tiger Beat for several years. I am hoping to find pictures in the Tower archives of my "Bat Cave" room at the Hazelwood house, which at one point I had decorated in pin ups, pictures, and posters from those magazines.

I am concerned that there is no photo.

I did karaoke before it was a thing with my mini amp and microphone, singing along to my favorite tunes. I feel my rendition of "Puppy Love" was spot on before my voice changed.

I had these large cardboard room dividers, which I think my Dad brought home from his office. I made literally a maze of dividers in this room and covered them with images of my favorite teen idols, though some of the hot items, like Leif Garrett, never really made much sense to me.

I share these two images of these two issues because I know for sure I had the one on the right, and I am fairly sure I had the one above, too.

I have shared a sampling of David Cassidy images here in the post, but I was careful not to go nuts.

The mix is fun and centers on Cassidy though leads with with "Heartbeat, It's a Lovebeat" from a performance on the Jack Benny show. I remember this album vividly. I wanted it more than almost any other album of that period. I expected the DeFranco Family to go on to super stardom but I do not own any of their other albums, and they had dropped from the radar after 1977. "Heartbeat, It's a Lovebeat" stayed at number one for five weeks and stayed at number two on that chart (AM radio) all of 1973. The single sold over two million copies.

Here's some blast from the past, which seems the right sounds for summer.





"It's a Lovebeat" - a Musical Monday Mix for 1807.30

1. DeFranco Family -  "Heartbeat, Its A Lovebeat" - 1973 - 3:27 
2. Donny Osmond - "Puppy Love" ( TOTP ) 1972 - 2:55 
3. Partridge Family - "I Think I Love You" - 3:50 
4. Marie Osmond - "Paper Roses" - 4:19 
5. Bobby Sherman - "Julie Do You Love Me" - 4:21 
6. Donny Osmond - "Go Away Little Girl" Live - 2:29 
7. The Archies - "Sugar Sugar Candy Girl" - 2:46 
8. The Mamas And The Papas - "California Dreamin'"  - 3:02 
9. The Osmonds - "One Bad Apple" (The Osmond Brothers) - 2:44
10. The Brady Bunch sings "Sunshine Day and Keep On Dancing" - 4:34 
11. The Monkees - "Daydream Believer" (Official Music Video) - 3:07 
12. Grand Funk - The Loco-Motion (1974) HQ - 2:56 
13. Michael Jackson and the Jackson Five- American Bandstand 1970 HD - 9:40 
14. David Cassidy - "Cherish" - 3:47 
15. Melanie & The Edwin Hawkins Singers - "LAY DOWN" LIVE '70 - 7:25
16. Cher - "Gypsys Tramps And Thieves" - 2:53 
17. DAVID CASSIDY and Partridge Family ~ "I WOKE UP IN LOVE THIS MORNING" **** HD/HQ AUDIO - 2:39 
18. David Cassidy on The Bob Hope Special, 1972 - 8:30 
19. Michael Jackson and Donny Osmond - rare appearance footage - 4:12 
20. David Cassidy - "Rock Me Baby" (1974) - 2:41 
21. Jackson 5 vs The Osmonds - by TheSpiderbeats 5:08


"It's a Lovebeat" - a Musical Monday Mix for 1807.30 - THE VIDEOS

























































EMBEDDED VIDEO LINK FOR ENTIRE PLAYLIST




+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1807.30 - 10:10

- Days ago = 1122 days ago

- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.


Sunday, July 29, 2018

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #1103 - Wood Song - Hey Mom Reprint


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #1103 - Wood Song -  - Hey Mom Reprint

Hi Mom,

I spotted this post when I was looking around in my blog. It's a post within a post within a post.
Number 1103 reposting #804 that reposts #114.

I like this method of finding the posts for reprints.

I have felt you strongly lately, Mom.

What if Ellory contains some of your spirit reincarnated. A look in her (Ellory's) eye made me think this the other day.

And so, this song, which is not about reincarnation or dogs or dead mothers, but is about faith, and love, and survival, and working together, community, spirit, carrying on.

I carry on, Mom.

I am somewhere new, but I am home.

from - http://sensedoubt.blogspot.com/2017/09/hey-mom-talking-to-my-mother-804-one.html

Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #804 - One song - "WOOD SONG" - Musical Monday 1709.18
Long Lake, Traverse City, 1971


Hi Mom,

I have always tried to reserve Monday for Musical Monday here on the blog.

But, as often happens, I have fallen behind.

So, I am indulging in not just a reprint, but a reprint from this very blog and its HEY MOM blog feature.

I asked myself to choose just one song for Musical Monday that had something to do with my current state of being.

This is the first song that came to mind and I did not second guess it or over think it.

Since I already had written about it during my seven songs in seven days feature 690 days ago, here it is again.

I mean really, after 690 days, and I cannot share it again?? :-)


Hey, Mom! Talking to My Mother #114 - Seven Songs: "The Wood Song"

Hi Mom,

Time for another song because I am really doing this seven songs in seven days thing. Today's song is about a boat, and see? We're in a boat. Yeah. That was planned.

All these songs this week were ones I played as I drove out to see you as you were dying. In fact, one day, I made a larger loop out around Gull Lake and past the old house just to get in more time with this music, that day I was heavy on Erykah Badu, who, though wonderful, is not making this list of seven, which is a shame. In fact, I am a bit ashamed of how "white" my list is, even though the next one will feature Mary J. Blige, though it did not originally. But it can't be helped. It is what it is.

Today's song is "The Wood Song" by the Indigo Girls from their 1994 album Swamp Ophelia. Here's two versions, live and in studio (the second is near the end of the post).

"The Wood Song" - The Indigo Girls - live
Toronto Pride, 2007








Like all of these songs in my selection, this song has seen me through tough times, which I think is the point of the song. This song helped me to persevere.

As I read the lyrics, this song I see that it is about a group of friends ("my friends and I have had a hard time"). One one level, as the song has many possible interpretations and can fit so many situations, I have always felt that this song is about being gay in America and how difficult that has been up to 1992-4-ish when it was written. Maybe that's too simplistic and only my association because I know the sexual identity of the two women in the Indigo Girls, and yet, I always think about that situation when I hear the song and more besides.

The song speaks of a change ("bruising our brains hard up against change all the old dogs and the magician") that's been resisted but now they ("my friends") are all together for the journey.

I have text from the Internet that I will share, but I think some miss the point of the point. The song mentions a point ("the prize is always worth the rocky ride but the wood is tired and the wood is old and we'll make it fine if the weather holds but if the weather holds then we'll have missed the point that's where i need to go"). One chap claimed it was a literal point in the story of Noah's Ark that is invoked by the song. True, the song uses Noah's Ark as a metaphor, but it's not ABOUT Noah's Ark (if even...). The point is the process. If the good weather holds, then there are no storms. In storms, we grow, so if we don't have storms we will miss the process that helps us to grow and change and evolve, hence: "the prize is always worth the rocky ride." It's just a tough ride, the wood is tired and old. I feel that way a lot. But we must go into the storm. It's the only way to evolve. After all, there's the other side of the storm, the change, the better world, but we only reach it going through the storm. If we stay put, we don't change, then there is no storm and thus no "prize" as there has been no "rocky ride."

Keep reading. The song basically re-iterates what I just shared in analysis. No one gets to miss the storm, they sing.

But the song is about love, courage, going on, keeping on, weathering storms, and, well, LIFE.

I am so thankful to have had the Indigo Girls in my life for nearly 30 years. Thank you Emily and Amy for such great joy.
"The Wood Song" by The Indigo Girls - lyrics
the thin horizon of a plan is almost clear my friends and I have had a hard time bruising our brains hard up against change all the old dogs and the magician now I see we're in the boat in two by twos only the heart that we have for a tool we could use and the very close quarters are hard to get used to love weighs the hull down with its weight but the wood is tired and the wood is old and we'll make it fine if the weather holds but if the weather holds then we'll have missed the point that's were i need to go no way construction of this tricky plan was built by other than a greater hand with a love that passes all our understanding watching closely over the journey yeah but what it takes to cross the great divide seems more than all the courage i can muster up inside but we get to have some answers when we reach the other side the prize is always worth the rocky ride but the wood is tired and the wood is old and we'll make it fine if the weather holds but if the weather holds then we'll have missed the point that's where i need to go sometimes i ask to sneak a closer look skip to the final chapter of the book and maybe steer us clear from some of the pain that it took to get us where we are this far but the question drowns in its futility and even i have got to laugh at me cause no one gets to miss the storm of what will be just holding on for the ride the wood is tired the wood is old and we'll make it fine if the weather holds but if the weather holds then we'll have missed the point that's where i need to go


Stuff by others.


"My boss recently gave a speech about commitment and weathering the storm, at the end of the year banquet. He used a favorite Indigo Girls ballad called "The Wood Song" to illustrate his point.

"As it so happens, this particular song has greater meaning to me than meets they eye. Now I believe that everything takes place for a reason...good and bad... painful and joyful. And so I leave you with the lyrics of this beautiful song to tie together the strings and even find the missing link of how it might bring wonder into our own life."

above from - http://ginkogal.blogspot.com/2008/05/new-england-life.html


from the you tube page with this video

namahe27 6 years ago:  I really like this song; especially now, as I am struggling finding the right thing to do. I dont seem to have the courage that it takes to go this way and instead of being with the one I love I rather play safe and might make a big mistake just because I am too concerned what other people would think. When I told my love that I just cant do it, she asked me to listen to this song.

kolipokinho 6 years ago  in reply to namahe27:  It's the story of Noah's ark, as seen from the perspective of an animal on board. "Now see we're in the boat in two by twos" gives it away.  "Wood" here refers to the wood that the ark is made of.  The old dogs are probably Noah's pets (or family, I don't know...) and the Magician I'm guessing, is Noah.  If the weather holds, and the flood continues, they would have missed the Point, which is probably Mount Ararat, where the ark ends up. At least that's how I understand the song.

kywomanlml 4 years ago:  I played this song to my mom in November of 1995 to help her understand why I was marrying my now husband. She was concerned our road would not be easy together. It hasn't been easy. But, years and years later, we're still weathering the storms of life and continuously learning to enjoy the ride.

Anne Mooney 9 months ago:  if one looks up the word harmony in the dictionary, it should have but one defenition: indigo girls. they've seen me through some horrible times in my life, for 25 years now. damn! that's a long ass time.

And this whole blog entry (which I will not reprint without permission here)

http://optimisticvoices.blogspot.com/2007/10/wood-song-indigo-girls.html

And - from - http://www.wbur.org/npr/9009196/two-decades-later-indigo-girls-voices-still-strong

I was wondering how difficult it is to maintain an interest in performing songs that have been around for 20 years. Do they begin to take on different meanings as time passes or is it difficult to keep an interest? I'm getting married next month and I lobbied the priest to allow me to walk down the aisle to a secular song - yours - "The Wood Song." "The Wood Song" has meant different, very precious things to me over the years, especially in my relationship. Do the meanings change for you as well? Thanks.

Ms. SALIERS: That's a good question. They do change sometimes. Sometimes I write a song and I think I'm writing it about somebody else or other people, and then I realize that I'm writing it about me. Or depending on what I'm going through in life, you know.




"The Wood Song" - The Indigo Girls


Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 116 days ago


- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1510.28 - 19:32


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reflect and connect.

Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you, Mom.

I miss you so very much, Mom.

Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
- Days ago = 806 days ago
- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1709.18 - 10:10
NEW (written 1708.27) NOTE on time: I am now in the same time zone as Google! So, when I post at 10:10 a.m. PDT to coincide with the time of your death, Mom, I am now actually posting late, so it's really 1:10 p.m. EDT. But I will continue to use the time stamp of 10:10 a.m. to remember the time of your death, Mom. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Reflect and connect.
Have someone give you a kiss, and tell you that I love you, Mom.
I miss you so very much, Mom.
Talk to you tomorrow, Mom.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Days ago = 1121 days ago

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1807.29 - 10:10

NEW (written 1708.27) NOTE on time: I am now in the same time zone as Google! So, when I post at 10:10 a.m. PDT to coincide with the time of your death, Mom, I am now actually posting late, so it's really 1:10 p.m. EDT. But I will continue to use the time stamp of 10:10 a.m. to remember the time of your death, Mom. I know this only matters to me, and to you, Mom.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

A Sense of Doubt blog post #1254 - 1984 Tigers in the Hall - Trammell and Morris elected to Baseball's Hall of Fame

https://www.letsgotribe.com/2014/12/31/7468857/alan-trammell-hall-of-fame-detroit-tigers-2015
A Sense of Doubt blog post #1254 - 1984 Tigers in the Hall - Trammell and Morris elected to Baseball's Hall of Fame

I am so happy to share this news.

My favorite Baseball player of all time -- along with five other really great players -- has been elected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Here's a list of links of some of the coverage of Alan Trammell being elected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame, which happens tomorrow, Sunday July 29th.

I don't understand why Trammell and Lou Whitaker were not elected in together.

Trammell ranks as the 9th greatest shortstop in history whereas Lou Whitaker ranks as the 13th greatest second baseman according to Bill James' Historical Abstract for Baseball.

In fact, Bill James doesn't really trot out the reasons for Trammell's excellence beyond mentioning that he is forever linked to his double-play partner: Sweet Lou Whitaker.

Perhaps in this group for this year, which also includes Trevor Hoffman, Jim Thome, Vlad Guerrero, and Chipper Jones, they felt they needed a starting pitcher, so Jack Morris with Sweet Lou to follow on an upcoming roster.

At least, these guys all showed up at Cooperstown, unlike Terrell Owens with the NFL Hall of Fame, which, despite disputes, is a classless move.


https://baseballhall.org/discover/morris-trammell-reflect-on-hof-honors

JACK MORRIS, ALAN TRAMMELL ELECTED TO HALL OF FAME




Part of the BASEBALL HISTORY series
Written by: Bill Francis
Celebrations may commence in the Motor City as pitcher Jack Morris and shortstop Alan Trammell are welcomed to immortality. The pair of longtime Tigers have joined baseball’s most exclusive fraternity.
The first two members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s Class of 2018 were announced by Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson on MLB Network Sunday, Dec. 10. The duo brings the total number of elected members to Cooperstown’s shrine to 319. Morris and Trammell were among the nine former big league players and one executive that comprised the 10-name Modern Baseball Era ballot, which was voted upon at Baseball’s Winter Meetings in Orlando, Fla.
Less than an hour after the news was released, an overwhelmed Morris and Trammell, Tigers teammates from 1977 to 1990, were on conference calls with the media sharing their thoughts on the momentous occasion.
“It’s really kind of overwhelming for me right now,” said the 62-year-old Morris. “I’m not sure I’m going to be able to put into words all of the emotions that I’m going through right now. Before I get started, I certainly want to thank everybody that supported me along the line and continues to support me.







And I’m so, so happy and proud of my teammate Alan Trammell," Morris said. "And the fact that we get to go in together is just overwhelming for me. I also want acknowledge the guys that were on the ballot that didn’t make it because I truly understand what they are going through and I feel for them. I think every one of them had a legitimate chance of making it and I was pulling for everyone. I don’t have a lot to say other than the fact that I understand and I hope someday I get to shake your hand, too.”
The right-handed Morris pitched from 1977 to 1994, winning 254 games for the Tigers, with whom he spent 14 of his 18 seasons, as well as for the Twins, Blue Jays and Indians. He was so dominant that during the 18 seasons he played, he led all major league pitchers in wins, starts, innings and complete games. He was a 20-game winner on three occasions and his 162 wins during the decade of the 1980s led all major league pitchers. The ace of the teams for whom he pitched, Morris made 14 Opening Day starts, which since 1920 is tied for second most with Hall of Famers Steve Carlton and Randy Johnson, and is two less than Tom Seaver. He was also a member of four World Series winning teams, including the 1984 Tigers, the 1991 Twins, and the 1992-93 Blue Jays, earning Fall Classic MVP honors in 1991 after pitching 10 shutout innings for Minnesota in Game 7 to beat the Braves. Today, the St. Paul, Minn. native is a broadcaster with the Twins and also works for MLB Network.
“I have so many things going through my head right now but more important than anything else is that I just want people to understand that time has made this even more special,” Morris said. “I’ve learned a lot along the way. Baseball was a huge part of my life and quite honestly I still enjoy the benefits of working in baseball but time makes everything change. I never thought would ever be as emotional as I was when Jane [Hall of Fame Chairman Jane Forbes Clark] called me a few minutes ago. With that being said, I’m very grateful and honored and humbled. I’m just going to let the questions fly now because I don’t know what else to say other than that, again, the time that I’ve spent wondering if this day would ever come seems to be vanished because it did come and it’s amazing.”


Trammell spent all 20 seasons of his major league career in a Detroit Tigers uniform, helping to anchor the middle of the infield. A shortstop who led by example, he posted a career average of .285 with 2,365 hits, batting .300 or better in seven different seasons. When he retired in 1996, his six seasons hitting at least .300 with 10 home runs were tied with fellow Hall of Famer Joe Cronin for the most among shortstops in big league history. With four Gold Glove Awards, three Silver Slugger Awards and six All-Star Game selections, Trammell played in one World Series, winning the Fall Classic MVP after hitting .450 with two home runs and six RBI over five games to lead the 1984 Tigers over the Padres. Today, he works with the Tigers as a special assistant in baseball operations.
“I’ve had a few minutes to kind of think about what I wanted to say. I am still just overwhelmed,” said the 59-year-old Trammell. “I know that word has been used a lot in these circumstances but I don’t know any other way to describe this. My mind is a whirlwind. Fortunately, I just got a call a few minutes ago from Jack Morris, who obviously was my teammate, and I’m so proud that Jack and I will be going in together. I thought that Jack was well deserving, and in my opinion should have been in and elected a few years ago, but nevertheless, it is an honor to go in to go in with Jack and I look forward to whoever goes in on the (BBWAA) ballot in January.
“I’m just honored to be a part of it. I don’t really know what else to say at this particular time. I’m usually not at a loss for words but at this particular time I don’t know what else to say.”
Trammell would later share the circumstances of his receiving the life-changing news.
“Yesterday, I went to a college basketball game in San Diego," Trammell said. "I got on a flight this morning and didn’t get in until 5:50 p.m. I was looking at the internet and knew when it was going to be announced; if my flight was delayed I’m not sure what would have happened.
For his career, Alan Trammell totaled 2,365 hits, 412 doubles and a .285 career batting average and hit .300-or-better in seven seasons. (Lou Sauritch/National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum)
For his career, Alan Trammell totaled 2,365 hits, 412 doubles and a .285 career batting average and hit .300-or-better in seven seasons. (Lou Sauritch/National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum)



















“So I was in the back of the plane and we had just landed and I turned my phone on – obviously you can’t have the phone on when you’re on the plane – and I turned it off airplane mode. Because I was in the back of the plane it took a few minutes to deplane, and I got the call. (Hall of Fame Chairman of the Board) Jane Clark was on the line and told me that I had been elected to the Hall of Fame. And at that point, what a phone call. I’ve got people around me so I’m trying to be somewhat under control. And I think I was, to a certain degree, but you can imagine my mind was racing. That’s how it came down. I was on an airplane waiting to deplane.”

Morris and Trammell be inducted in Cooperstown on July 29, 2018, along with any electees who emerge from the 2018 Baseball Writers’ Association of America election, to be announced on Jan. 24, 2018.

Bill Francis is a Library Associate at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum


Jack Morris topped the 200-inning mark in 11 seasons and notched 175 complete games, the most of any pitcher whose career started after 1976.  (Rich Pilling/National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum)
Jack Morris topped the 200-inning mark in 11 seasons and notched 175 complete games, the most of any pitcher whose career started after 1976. (Rich Pilling/National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum)























A LIST OF GOOD LINKS AND RESOURCES

https://www.mlb.com/news/jack-morris-alan-trammell-elected-to-hall/c-263207676

https://www.mlb.com/news/alan-trammell-should-be-in-hall-of-fame/c-262431218

https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/12/10/hall-fame-results-jack-morris-alan-trammell-marvin-miller

https://www.freep.com/story/sports/mlb/tigers/2018/07/27/alan-trammell-jack-morris-hall-fame/841713002/

https://www.freep.com/story/sports/mlb/tigers/2018/07/28/alan-trammell-jack-morris-2018-baseball-hall-fame/853778002/

https://www.freep.com/picture-gallery/sports/mlb/tigers/2018/07/27/2018-baseball-hall-fame/846914002/


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++









JACK MORRIS - - BASEBALL REFERENCE


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Here's some of my content from my T-shirt blog with DETROIT TIGERS and especially Trammell love.

Alan Trammell is and always has been my favorite Baseball player of all time. Well, at least since he debuted.

The 1984 re-ignited my love of Baseball, a fact I had forgotten from about 1975 to 1984. I blame obnoxious popular people in high school.

Because, damn... I love Baseball.

From - http://365-tshirts.blogspot.com/2013/07/t-shirt-120-bless-you-boys-1984-tigers.html

T-shirt #120: Bless You Boys: 1984 Tigers

Regular Baseball games resume today, and I would like to dedicate myself to a few words (okay, A LOT of words depending on your definition of "few") about one of the greatest Detroit Tigers teams of all time and one of the greatest sports teams ever: THE 1984 DETROIT TIGERS and other related topics.

I would also like to dedicate some content to one of my top five favourite people in the history of Baseball, and the only one who is not a player: ERNIE HARWELL, the voice of the Detroit Tigers as well as my favourite Baseball player ever.

Ernie is responsible for coining the phrase "Bless You, Boys" that was the theme of that magical 1984 season and World Series victory. (See one of the comments. Actually, Ernie did not coin this phrase. I was wrong!)

1984 was the last time the Detroit Tigers won the World Series.

Today has been a bit crazy as I was out at my parents' house taking care of my mother while my father goes to Detroit to see his mother when I started writing this entry and finished later at home. I am sharing that fact because I had originally planned a long, essay, love-letter for this post, and now I am simply in a hurry just to finish the blog entry. So, instead of the long, love letter to the 1984 Detroit Tigers team, let me try something else: short (I think they are short) nuggets of observation, reflection, and/or opinion linked by pictures.

THE CORNER OF MICHIGAN AND TRUMBULL: As much as I love Comerica Park, I grew up going to games at Tigers Stadium. Though I did not make it to any playoff or World Series games in 1984, I did make it over to Detroit in the summer for one game. I like that this shirt features the stadium's location and years of service on the back with the 1984 team's World Series games and scores.

This shirt was a commemorative souvenir created for the celebration of the last year at Tigers Stadium for fans to remember some of their favourite memories from Tigers Stadium. I went to dozens of games at the old Corner of Michigan and Trumbull. It was a very special place for me.




ALAN TRAMMELL

My all-time favourite Baseball player is Alan Trammell and has been since 1984. I did not have one favourite Baseball player let alone one Detroit Tiger prior to crowning Trammell as my champion. I had many favourite players and many favourite Detroit Tigers.

Trammell was everything I wanted to be. He was smart and consistent. He was intense and focused. He was a winner. He was smooth and defensively solid. He was quiet. He led by example. Did I mention the smarts?

Bill James rated Alan Trammell as the ninth best shortstop in the history of the game in the same Historical Abstract book that I wrote about in T-shirt #115 and the Chicago Cubs (Ron Santo).

Trammell is Hall of Fame bound. He has been on the ballot since 2001. Eventually, he and Sweet Lou will be inducted. Not yet.

Trammell was World Series MVP in 1984.

He sat at Sparky's side and learned from one of the greatest managers in the history of the game. And though Tram's first run as Detroit Tigers manager was not the most stellar, he is getting more seasoning as Kirk Gibson's bench coach with the Arizona Diamondbacks, who are currently in first place in the NL West.

Though Tram was not a power home run hitter (only 185), and though he did not hit enough to reach the lofty and exclusive 3000 hit club (only 28 players have so far in MLB history), he knocked 2365 hits in his career, which is not too shabby and a feat few have accomplished. Though I am not going to report Tram's position in MLB history with his career hit total, he is seventh on the all-time Tigers list after two of the Tigers in 3000 hit club (Ty Cobb and Al Kaline) plus Gehringer, Heilmann, Crawford, and Sweet Lou Whitaker (who has just four more hits than Tram, his infield partner for all those years).

Here's a great blog entry from last year that expresses many sentiments I share about the grand old ball park.

ALAN TRAMMELL REMEMBERS TIGERS STADIUM

Trammell embodied the best spirit of that time and the very nature of Ernie's phrase "Bless You Boys!"


THE DETROIT TIGERS 1984 SEASON
Commemorative hat from the
2012 World Series

The Tigers exploded out of the gate in 1984 like no other team that year, no other Tigers team in history, with one of the best starts in Major League history.

The Tigers cruised to a 35-5 record in the first 40 games and one of the top ten best starts by a team in major league history.

A writer collected these starts at BLEACHER REPORT.

The Tigers ended up  with 104 wins and 58 losses, which is not the best record in Baseball history, but it is one of the best. And in 1984, the Tigers' record was far and away the best of that year with the next best team back at 96 wins (The Chicago Cubs).

But 1984 is special to me because it brought me back to Baseball and reminded me of how much I loved the Tigers and Baseball.

Unlike the last time when the Tigers won the World Series (1968) when I was only six years old, the 1984 win meant a lot more to me because I was watching the games with my college friends (and sometimes my father) and engaging in adult conversations about the Tigers and Baseball.

The Tigers have not won the World Series since.

Most of all, I remember the summer of 1984 and how it re-kindled my forgotten love of Baseball.

I think puberty turned me temporarily insane. I didn't really fully grow out of the insanity until I was in my forties.

But early on, I remembered how much I loved Baseball, and I have been devoted ever since.

Hat is from Spring Training 2009
which I attended with my best pal.
Hat is a purged gift from him.
Photo courtesy of Robert Tower
BOOKS ABOUT BASEBALL

I love books about Baseball. Here's a picture of me posing with some of my books about the Tigers (though not all of my books about the Tigers) and all my books written by Ernie Harwell, most of which are signed.

This love of Baseball books should not surprise anyone. After all, I am the writerly, bookish type. Naturally, one of the things I love best about Baseball is the study of Baseball: statistics, stories, and history. The LORE. This is what Ernie gave me a passion for: THE LORE. He told the legends of Baseball both big and small like no other storyteller I have ever heard speak about Baseball.

I have written eight posts (including this one) about Baseball since I started the blog. I have written all but one of these Baseball posts about the Detroit Tigers.

And if you think I am out of Baseball shirts, you do not understand me at all. I have much more to share about Baseball, The Detroit Tigers, the 1984 team, Alan Trammell, Tigers Stadium, and Ernie Harwell. Stay tuned. Oh, and I should not forget to mention: Sparky Anderson.


ERNIE HARWELL

Ernie took over as the voice of the Detroit Tigers two years before I was born (1960) and finally retired the year I was 38 years old (which was also the year my mother almost died from bacterial meningitis). For 38 years of my life, Ernie was the voice of the Detroit Tigers. As I wrote in T-shirt #115, I think I nailed it:

"I love listening to Baseball on the radio. This is one of the central truths of my love for Baseball. It is presented in its most classic form on the radio. I grew up listening to the Detroit Tigers on the radio, the sonorous voice of Ernie Harwell crackling across my AM band, hand-sized transistor late into the night."
I am nothing if not self-referential and meticulous about the ongoing story I am constructing in these virtual pages.

Thank you, Ernie. I miss you.

2013 TIGERS

There are high hopes for our Detroit Tigers this year. They made it to the World Series last year but lost to the San Francisco Giants. A lot of chatter holds with the idea that if the Tigers had opened that series at home, they would have won.

Most Tigers fans expect the Tigers to go back and win it this year. Surely that's possible. But for many fans, it's almost a certainty, and they place unreasonable expectations on this year's team.

True, Six players were All Stars.

True, the team is much the same as last year's with the addition of a returned Victor Martinez. Pitching from Scherzer has been epic. And though many grumble that the Tigers need a bonafide "closer," I do not hold with the magic of a special person that closes games. They just need good pitchers in the pen. Anyone can pitch at the end of the game. If the pitcher is a good one, he will not give up runs very often. If he is not so good, he will often be shelled.

After the Tigers won the World Series in 1984, given the talent of the team, given the number of great players on the team, people expected a dynasty, expected them to return every year for at least the rest of the 1980s. They did not play in the Series again for 22 years.

Some of the players on the current team have done what neither the 1968 nor the 1984 team could do: play in the World Series twice (2006 and 2012) in six years.

They say that "three times is the charm."

BLESS YOU BOYS!

Have a great second half of the season. First pitch of game 95 is minutes away.

GO TIGERS!

- chris tower - 1307.19 - 20:07 (first pitch tonight at 20:10).



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

- Bloggery committed by chris tower - 1807.28 - 10:10



- Days ago = 1120 days ago



- New note - On 1807.06, I ceased daily transmission of my Hey Mom feature after three years of daily conversations. I plan to continue Hey Mom posts at least twice per week but will continue to post the days since ("Days Ago") count on my blog each day. The blog entry numbering in the title has changed to reflect total Sense of Doubt posts since I began the blog on 0705.04, which include Hey Mom posts, Daily Bowie posts, and Sense of Doubt posts. Hey Mom posts will still be numbered sequentially. New Hey Mom posts will use the same format as all the other Hey Mom posts; all other posts will feature this format seen here.